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Elusive Mercury in the Evening December 1, 2017

Posted by aquillam in Astronomy, MichiganAstro, Urban Observing.
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This weekend promises amazing weather for December in SE Michigan. Take advantage of it by looking for the elusive planet Mercury!

Sunset on December 1 in A2 is at about 5:03 PM, and Mercury sets at about 6, so grab a pair of binoculars and go out between roughly 5:15 – 5:45 and look low in the SW. Be sure to check out Saturn too: it’ll disappear behind the Sun soon! The image below is for 5:30 on Friday December 1, 2017

As the days progress, Mercury gets closer to the Sun in the sky (yes, it’s in retrograde), so by the 5th or 6th it’ll be all but impossible to catch! Conjunction is on the 12th. Saturn conjunction is December 21. 01Dec1730SW_Mercury.png

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Venus and the Beehive August 30, 2017

Posted by aquillam in Astronomy, MichiganAstro, Urban Observing.
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If you happen to be up around 6 AM local time the next few mornings (August 31 – September 2, 2017) grab a pair of binoculars. Venus skims past one of my favorite open clusters in the pre-dawn hours.

Look east, between the Big Dipper and Orion, just below Gemini. You won’t be able to miss Venus. It’ll even shine through light cloud cover! If it’s clear, point your binoculars that way and you’ll see the Beehive cluster, so called because it sort of looks like a bee skep tipped on its side with the bees buzzing around it (a skep is the round, woven grass type of beehive.) It’s a fairly bright cluster, so even a small pair of binoculars will do. You probably won’t want to haul out the telescope for this because you need a 2º field of view, which most telescopes won’t do.

If you live in really dark skies, plop a camera down on a tripod and try taking a 1 – 2 second exposure. Longer will capture more stars, but overexpose Venus.

Here’s a chart looking east at 6 AM on August 31 from Ann Arbor:

31Aug0600E

Venus brightest around February 16 | EarthSky.org February 16, 2017

Posted by aquillam in Astronomy, MichiganAstro, Urban Observing.
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If it’s clear where you are this evening (or the next several evenings really), look high in the west about half an hour after sunset. That incredibly bright point of light you see is not a star, it’s Venus! If you happen to have a small telescope or good pair of binoculars, take a look at it. You’ll see it’s actually a crescent!

As long as you’ve got your telescope/binoculars out, be sure to check out the little red point nearby. That’s Mars. In fact, it’s pretty much a full Mars. How can two planets be so close in the sky and so different in appearance? Because one of them is nearby, almost between us and the Sun, while the other is far away, with the Sun in between.

For more on Venus, check out this story from Earth-Sky:

 

Venus is brighter around February 16-17, 2017 than at any other time during its ongoing, approximate, 9.6-month reign in the evening sky.

Source: Venus brightest around February 16 | EarthSky.org

Transit of Mercury May 9 2016 May 6, 2016

Posted by aquillam in Astronomy, MichiganAstro, Urban Observing.
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Phil Plait posted a very nice guide to the transit. It includes a long list of available webcasts, in case it’s cloudy or night where you are.

The highlights:

You’ll need magnification. DO NOT LOOK AT THE SUN WITHOUT APPROPRIATE FILTERS.

The transit runs 11:12 – 18:39 UT, or about 7:12 AM to 2:39 PM Ann Arbor time.

If you’re in SE Michigan, here’s a list of places you can go to observe the transit.